Languages:
Home » DBP » Level 2 » Question 4

Phthalate Di-butyl phthalate

4. How can humans be exposed to DBP?

  • 4.1 How can workers be exposed to DBP?
  • 4.2 How can consumers be exposed to DBP?
  • 4.3 To what extent can the general public be exposed to DBP through the environment?

4.1 How can workers be exposed to DBP?

Workplace exposure to DBP may occur during the production of DBP, the production of products that contain DBP and the use of those products.

Exposure levels in DBP production by inhalation are estimated to be below 2 mg/m3 with a reasonable worst case of 5 mg/m3 averaged over a shift, with possible short-term exposure levels of up to 10 mg/m3. The highest skin exposure during the production of DBP can occur when DBP is placed in drums and was estimated to be up to 420 mg/day. Estimated exposures during the processing of products containing up to 15% of DBP are the same as during the production of DBP.

In the end use of products, inhalation exposure to DBP is negligible for techniques that do not involve aerosols. For those that do involve aerosols, the reasonable worst-case exposure level is estimated to be 10 mg/m3 averaged over a shift, with typical values of 2 mg/m3 and short-term exposure levels of up to 20 mg/m3. Skin exposure during prolonged spray application of products containing DBP is estimated to be up to 975 mg/day. Other activities with products containing DBP are expected to lead to lower skin exposure levels. More...

The same information on
DIDP-DINPDEHP

4.2 How can consumers be exposed to DBP?

In this asssessment, attention was focussed on products containing a relatively large concentration of DBP, such as cosmetics (especially nail polish and enamels), adhesives and regenerated cellulose film (cellophane) wrapped food. Attention was also given to the intentional and unintentional use of DBP in children’s toys, in view of the general public concern on the use of phthalates in PVC toys.

The estimated total internal dose from each of these exposures was 0.027 mg/kg body weight/day from cellophane wrapped food and much lower from any other consumer exposures. More...

The same information on
DIDP-DINPDEHP

4.3 To what extent can the general public be exposed to DBP through the environment?

For the general public, the total daily intake through air, drinking water and food is estimated to be low including around local production and use sites. It ranges from 0.7 to just under 100 g/kg body weight/day depending on exposure circumstances.

DBP has been identified in human breast milk. The exposure via breast milk for infants is estimated to vary between 1.2 and 6 g/kg body weight/day. More...

The same information on
DIDP-DINPDEHP

FacebookTwitterEmailDownload (10 pages, 0.2 MB)
Themes covered
Publications A-Z
Leaflets