Languages:
Home » DEHP » Level 3 » Question 4

Diethylhexyl phthalate

4. How can humans be exposed to DEHP?

  • 4.1 How can workers be exposed to DEHP?
  • 4.2 How can consumers be exposed to DEHP?
  • 4.3 To what extent can the general public be exposed to DEHP through the environment?

The source document for this Digest states:

4 HUMAN HEALTH

4.1 HUMAN HEALTH (TOXICITY)

4.1.1 Exposure assessment

Human populations exposed to DEHP are: workers, consumers including patients, and indirect exposure of man via the environment. Also children and babies have been considered in this risk assessment. MOSs have been calculated for single and multiple pathways of exposure. It should be noted that several exposure scenarios have been identified for different human populations. However, there may be other relevant exposure scenarios that have not been identified.

Source & ©: ECB,
 "Bis-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate, DEHP), Summary Risk Assessment report" , 2008. p.13.

The same information on
DBPDIDP-DINP

4.1 How can workers be exposed to DEHP?

The source document for this Digest states:

Occupational exposure

Occupational exposure to DEHP, mainly through inhalation but also via the dermal route, occurs in the production of DEHP, industrial use of DEHP as an additive, and at industrial end-use of semi-manufactured products and end-products containing DEHP. For the inhalation exposure, exposure has been assessed based on both measured data and modelled data, whereas dermal exposure solely is assessed using the EASE model.

The occupational exposure is shown in Table 4.1.

Source & ©: ECB,
 "Bis-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate, DEHP), Summary Risk Assessment report" , 2008. p.13.

The same information on
DBPDIDP-DINP

4.2 How can consumers be exposed to DEHP?

The source document for this Digest states:

Consumer exposure

The general population can be divided into sub-populations, as the extent of exposure is expected to be different in different sub-populations (e.g. adults, young/children), partly caused by a suspected higher bio-availibility of DEHP in children than in adults. The exposure can be via many different sources, such as indoor air, car interiors, toys, and medical equipment (here defined as consumer exposure), as well as indirectly via the environment (including via breast milk).

Among the consumer exposure scenarios, the highest exposure results from toys and child- care articles (a total child exposure of 0.2 mg/kg/day is estimated) as well as from some of the medical equipments, and these exposure estimates are also based to a large extent on measured data. The exposure scenarios for medical equipment causing high exposure are long-term haemodialysis in adults (3.1 mg/kg/day), long-term blood transfusion in children (0.075 mg/kg/day), transfusions in neonates (1.7 mg/kg/day), and extracorporal oxygenation in children (based on a qualitative assessment). For the other consumer exposure scenarios, exposure is lower and also based to a larger extent on estimated exposure figures.

Source & ©: ECB,
 "Bis-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate, DEHP), Summary Risk Assessment report" , 2008. p.14.

The same information on
DBPDIDP-DINP

4.3 To what extent can the general public be exposed to DEHP through the environment?

The source document for this Digest states:

Humans exposed via the environment

For exposure of man indirectly via the environment, urinary biomonitoring of DEHP and it’s metabolites has been used to assess the regional exposure to DEHP. This approach resulted in an exposure level of 17 µg/kg/day, and is thought to represent the combined exposure via multiple pathways. Local exposure has been assessed using the EUSES model, both for children and adults. Numerous generic scenarios have been assessed, resulting in exposure to 2-67 µg/kg/day for adults and 20-312 µg/kg/day for children. However, when site-specific data has been made available (for approximately 20 out of 800 plants), the estimated exposure is 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than in the generic scenarios.

Data on the concentration of DEHP in breast milk and infant formula has been used to assess exposure of infants (0-3 months of age) and children above 6 months of age. The highest exposure occurs in infants, with an exposure to 6 or 13 µg/kg/day, from breast milk and formula, respectively.

Source & ©: ECB,
 "Bis-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate, DEHP), Summary Risk Assessment report" , 2008. p.14.

The same information on
DBPDIDP-DINP

FacebookTwitterEmail
Themes covered
Publications A-Z
Leaflets