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Endocrine Disruptors

 

Endocrine Disruptors Links

  1. Factual links

    Some of the websites providing factual information on Endocrine Disruptors:

    • 1.1 Some Q&As and FAQs on endocrine disrupting chemicals
    • 1.2 More information for the non-specialist
    • 1.3 Some institutions addressing endocrine disruptors
  2. Other Views
    • 2.1 Conclusions of some other recent EDC assessments
    • 2.2 Some of the sites suggesting that EDCs pose more risks
    • 2.3 Some of the sites suggesting that EDCs pose less risks

See also our page containing sites linking to this Digest

 

1. Factual links

1.1 Some Q&As and FAQs on endocrine disrupting chemicals
1.2 More information for the non-specialist
1.3 Some institutions addressing endocrine disruptors
 

2. Other Views

Links in this section have been selected as examples of other views on Endocrine Disruptors. This list of links is only a sample and it is not suggested that it is complete nor that it is fully representative of all the existing views. GreenFacts asbl takes no position concerning the views expressed in these linked documents.

2.1 Conclusions of some other recent EDC assessments
  • The US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) concludes in its 1997 "Special Report on Environmental Endocrine Disruption: an Effects Assessment and Analysis" that "With few exceptions (DES, DDT/DDE and some PCBs) a causal relationship between exposure to a specific environmental agent and an adverse health effect in humans via endocrine disruption has not been established" http://oaspub.epa.gov/   
  • The EU Scientific Committee for Toxicity, Ecotoxicity and the Environment (CSTEE) of the European Commission concludes in its 1999 "Opinion on Human and Wildlife Health Effects of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals" - on human health effects that "Although there are associations between endocrine disrupting chemicals, so far investigated, and human health disturbances, a causative role of these chemicals in diseases and abnormalities possibly related to an endocrine disturbance has not been verified" - on wildlife effects that "There is strong evidence obtained from laboratory studies showing the potential of several environmental chemicals to cause endocrine disruption at environmentally realistic exposure levels. In wildlife populations, associations have been reported between reproductive and developmental effects and endocrine disrupting chemicals."  http://ec.europa.eu/comm/food/  
  • The US NAS states in 1999 in its report: "Hormonally Active Agents in the Environment": "Although it is clear that exposures to hormonally active agents (HAAs) at high concentrations can affect wildlife and human health, the extent of harm caused by exposure to these compounds in concentrations that are common in the environment is debated. " www.nap.edu/openbook/0309064198/html/ 
2.2 Some of the sites suggesting that EDCs pose more risks
2.3 Some of the sites suggesting that EDCs pose less risks

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